ESPN 53rd Annual Meeting

ESPN 2021


 
EVALUATION OF VACCINATION RATES AND ANTIBODY TITERS IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE AND COMPARISON WITH HEALTHY CHILDREN
MERVE BOYRAZ 1 NILÜFER GÖKNAR 1 CENGIZ CANDAN 1

1- ISTANBUL MEDENIYET UNIVERSITY
 
Introduction:

Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of developing bacterial and viral infections. However, vaccination rates and post-vaccination seroconversion levels of patients with CKD are lower than healthy children. In this study, it is aimed to evaluate the vaccination rates of children with CKD and the antibody titers against vaccines and to compare them with healthy children. 

Material and methods:

In this retrospective study, 90 pediatric patients with CKD and 36 healthy children were included. 

Results:

High vaccination rates in children with CKD were present in Hepatitis B (93.4%), Measles (92.2%), OPV (91.1%), DaBT (90%), BCG (87.8%), Rubella (84.4%), Mumps (84.4%), HiB (77.8%), and PCV vaccines (67.8%). The lowest vaccination rates were seen in chickenpox (53.3%) and hepatitis A vaccines (54.4%). It was determined that 46 (57.6%) of 84 CKD patients who were administered hepatitis B vaccine and 22 (61.1%) of 36 children from the healthy control group have positive antibody titers. There were no statistically significant difference between controls and CKD children for Hepatitis B seroconversion rates (p= 0.09). However, when the serum levels of vaccine antibodies were measured, significantly lower antibody titers were observed in patients in the HD-PD group compared to healthy controls and children with stage 3-4 CKD (p = 0.034). In the control group, the percentage of positive antibodies to measles vaccine and antibody titer were found as significantly higher than the patients with CKD (p = 0.02 and p = 0.0001, respectively). Healthy children can produce a better antibody response to Rubella vaccine than patients with CKD (p = 0.03). No statistically significant difference was found between the patients with CKD and the control group for mumps and chickenpox antibody titers (p>0.05). Positive antibody response percentages with hepatitis A vaccine were found as significantly higher in the control group than the patients with CKD (p= 0.03).

Conclusions:

It has been shown that antibody response to vaccines occurs in most children with CKD, but these values were lower for some vaccines compared to healthy children and therefore these children should be followed closely. Children with CKD should receive age-appropriate vaccines and vaccination schedules must be checked in clinical visits.