ESPN 53rd Annual Meeting

ESPN 2021


 
Publication rate and research topics of studies in pediatric kidney transplantation
Patry Christian 1 Cordts Stefanie 1 Baumann Lukas 2 Höcker Britta 1 Fichtner Alexander 1 Ries Markus 1 Tönshoff Burkhard 1

1- UNIVERSITY CHILDRENS HOSPITAL HEIDELBERG
2- INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL BIOMETRY AND INFORMATICS, UNIVERSITY OF HEIDELBERG
 
Introduction:

 

The quality of medical care for pediatric kidney transplant recipients also depends on evidence from clinical trials. This evidence could be negatively influenced by a publication bias resulting from selective non-publication of studies. Publication bias is currently considered a major problem in evidence-based medicine.

Material and methods:

 

We therefore examined the publication rate, time to publication and factors associated with non- or late publication of studies in pediatric kidney transplantation registered on ClinicalTrials.gov from 1999 to 2020. We searched for respective publications on PubMed, GoogleScholar and by directly contacting principal investigators and/or study sponsors. Late publication was defined as a publication later than 3 years after completion. Data ware compared by binary logistic regression- and Kaplan Meier analysis.

Results:

 

We identified 138 studies on pediatric kidney transplantation with an overall enrolment of 36678 study participants. Only 55.8% of these studies were published until closure of the database (November 2, 2020). Unpublished studies included data from 12014 study patients. The median time to publication was 25 months (range, 0 - 117) with significantly earlier publications in more recent years. The most frequent research topic was immunosuppressants (68/138 [49.3%]), followed by perioperative management (15/138 [10.9%]) and infectiology (14/138 [10.1%]). 41.3% of all studies were randomized controlled trials. Factors favoring publication of a study at all were a co-funding by industry (P=0.003) and the research topic infectiology (P=0.046). Factors associated with late publication were the research topic immunosuppressants (P=0.017), co-funding by industry (P=0.004) and a randomized controlled study design (P=0.019). The level of the respective impact factor was not associated with the time to publication.

Conclusions:

 

Currently, nearly half of all registered and completed studies in pediatric kidney transplantation remain unpublished. This and the relative long time to publication might lead to a publication bias with a negative impact on clinical decision making.